Leah is 29 and was born with cerebral palsy. This limits the use of her legs and to a lesser extent her arms. She also has learning disabilities.

When you first meet Leah it is hard for Leah’s condition not to dominate your impression of her. But try – because Leah is a warm, funny, sociable extraordinarily determined person.

Since she was 20, Leah has lived in a Langdon house, that has been specially adapted for her, with three other housemates. Leah’s support team at Langdon work with her to strengthen her muscles. She does this by walking with a walker and swimming regularly. Leah works at the Langdon New Chapters project and in offices shredding their paper for an income.

In Leah’s case, where you might think her disabilities are highly visible, we encourage you to go beyond the superficial and see the full person. As Leah’s father, David says, “If you take the time to get to know Leah, you will see she is beautiful both inside and out.”

Leah is just one of 23,171 people in the Jewish community who have learning disabilities, according to research by JPR, commissioned by Langdon. As Langdon celebrates its 25th Anniversary, we thought it important to highlight not just the scale of the issue, but to understand more about the ‘invisible disabilities’ and the people who have them.

“If you take the time to get to know Leah, you will see she is beautiful both inside and out.”

Leah’s father, David